Where are we now?

“Where are we now?”

a photobook

about

the south-eastern corners of Europe

by

Geert Van Den Eede (photography)

 

isbn: 9789082399219

238mm x299mm – 56 pages – multidesign white (150 g) – bichromate printing (LED UV) – ota binding

With Ognjen Lopušina (essay) – Grégoire Romefort (graphic design) – Olivier Dengis (lithography) – L.capitan (printing company) – Cape of Good Hope –  Brussels 2018

available here

 ALSO AVAILABLE IN SOME GREAT BOOKSHOPS IN BRUSSELS

( Filigranes, Hors Format, Candide, Tipi Bookshop , Wiels Bookshop…. others will follow)

 

Andreas Raptis (film critic, art journalist, punk philosopher), Athens, May 2018:

“Welcome to the cement heart of the Balkan soul that swirls between the overwhelming challenges of the predatory future and the blessed reminiscence of the past. Picture frames and rampant aims, this is the crossroads of MC Escher architectural landscapes, with the divine creator as an MC precursor of the present.

Wandering for a period of 10 years to the south eastern corners of Europe (Albania, Serbia, Kosovo, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Romania) photographer Geert Van Den Eede lays no poetic justice in his gaze and unveils the classic raw story from the balkan anchorage: 30 years after the end of communism and 20 years after the Balkan wars and still no winner. Only class-conscious figures that give battle on the move for the better future (unaware of the shape of things to come).
Truth unfolds its sublime sarcasm: one cannot escape totalitarianism even in its most appealing form (call me by your name: neoliberalism).
The Cape of Good Hope seems far away but there is greater hope since photobooks of such integrity come to life (print).”


 

 

 

 

 

 

Christer Ek (Who needs another photo blog, 22 May 2018)

“Concrete is very present throughout the book, it gives rythm to the sequences and punctuates the spaces, both public and private. It is subject, becomes scenery, sometimes disappears in rural areas to reappear further. It is the leitmotif of this country, a promise of a modernity to come which is already fading by turning to new futures, like this cosmonaut with the colors of America and its neoliberalism devastating trend. There remains, however, a certain grace in these modernist abstractions, but perhaps it is the same kind of grace that can be found in the photographs « underexposed on an expired 3200 ASA film from a forgotten East German stock », to quote Ognjen Lopušina.”

 

O. Lopušina, Belgrade, October 2017:

“There is a lot to say about Europe, the Balkans and the way they stare at each other. To most European eyes, the Balkans are an underexposed version of European reality, shot on an expired 3200 ASA film from a forgotten East German stock. European eyes seem to be strongly attracted to the huge crystals of silver bromide. The Balkans appear to them as enticing and juicy – is that because Europe’s identities are being harmonized with so much pain? – but with a very limited utility. On the other hand, when we are looking at Europe through our Balkan eyes, we are staring into a perfectly exposed reality with a brilliant dynamic range. We are looking at the pixels with respect although in sotto voce we murmur that it’s mostly post-production, that behind those magnificently crafted European landscapes, everything is far less luxurious.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cape of Good Hope, Brussels, April 2018:

“Geert has travelled over a period of 10 years to the south eastern corners of Europe (Albania, Serbia, Kosovo, Croatia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Macedonia Fyrom, Romania, ….). 30 years after the end of communism and 20 years after the Balkan wars, he is investigating in a poetic and personal way the impact of the free market on local landscapes and communities. Ognjen Lopušina, an author from Belgrade, is questioning the western point of view in an accompanying text. The book is called Where are we now?

 

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